Monday, June 8, 2015

Last Week's News in Indian Country

A recap of the stories that mattered most in Indian country:

PRIME TIME PLAYERS: Athletes from Montana’s Blackfeet Indian Reservation will soon be getting some national exposure. Officials from Reebok and NBC Sports sponsored a team from the reservation located in Browning to compete in the network’s gruelling Spartan Race held in Bigfork, Montana earlier last month. An hour-long broadcast, depicting the team’s training and race-day trials and tribulations, will be shown on NBC Sports on July 23.

HISTORIC STEP: The Penobscot Indian Nation and the Passamaquoddy Tribe took history into their hands last week when they permanently withdrew their representatives from the Maine legislature, ending almost two centuries of participation in the state’s political process.

INVESTIGATION REOPENED: Peruvian authorities have reopened the forced sterilizations case involving over 300,000 mostly indigenous women, and will investigate further the testimony of former President Alberto Fujimori and three of his Health Ministers.

NO RESPECT: Yet another auction of sacred Hopi artifacts has taken place in Paris despite the efforts of Hopi officials and U.S. lawmakers. The auctioneers EVE (Estimations Ventes aux Encheres) conducted the auction on June 1 at the Drouot auction house in Paris.

WOMEN'S LIVES MATTER: Kiowa filmmaker Jeffrey Palmer addresses violence toward Indigenous women in "I Am a Life," a video featuring Native women making simple statements about their humanity.

THE LEGENDS BEGIN: When the Lancaster School District in upstate New York retired its controversial Native American mascot in March, the question, then, became: what is the new mascot going to be? That question was answered Wednesday after the student body there voted to be the ‘Lancaster Legends.’

THE OTHER SIDE OF THE STORY: Four actors who didn't walk off the set of Adam Sandler's Ridiculous Six, and felt that the film wasn't disrespectful, shared their stories with ICTMN.

LAND REGAINED: The Coquille Indian Tribe in southern coastal Oregon purchased 3,200 ecologically and culturally significant acres of forestland in Oregon’s Siskiyou National Forest on May 21. They’ve named it Sek-wet-se, their people’s name for the river and their ancestors who lived there.
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NTI-VETO: The Coeur d’Alene Tribe has petitioned the Idaho Supreme Court over Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter’s veto of a gaming bill, and the subsequent refusal of Idaho's Sec. of State Lawerence Denney to certify it as law.

BALLERS: Young athletes got instruction from some of basketball’s best teachers at the “The Hoop,” a basketball clinic at Salish Kootenai College (SKC) on the Flathead Reservation in Montana in May.

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2015/06/07/week-was-big-stories-indian-country-june-7-2015-160632

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