Saturday, July 17, 2010

This Week from Indian Country Today

Iroquois Nationals forfeits first game
NEW YORK – A week-long international dispute over the use of Haudenosaunee passports has caused the Iroquois Nationals to forfeit the opening game of the 2010 World Lacrosse Championships, but team members were still hoping to fly to England for the remaining matches. Read more »

Related Content:
Iroquois Nationals travel window closing
Obama administration may thwart Iroquois Nationals’ tournament travel
Iroquois Nationals’ tournament departure delayed by travel snafu
NCAI calls on UK to grant entry for World Championships

Headlines

NCAI calls on UK to grant entry for World Championships
Fifth Circuit upholds religious rights of American Indian kindergartner
Drunk driver loses appeal after a high-speed fatal crash
Tribe reburies aboriginal warrior killed in 1800s
An Indian finds himself on the Emerald Isle
EPA gives approval of Kennecott discharge pipes
Day of prayer for Eagle Rock this Sunday
Northwest tribe revels in ‘Twilight’ spotlight
Seeking applications for Tribal Technology Leadership Award
First Native non-eagle feather repository established
Patricia Whitefoot named to National Advisory Council on Indian Education
Eight Northwest leaders attend Chinook’s First Salmon Ceremony
State ferry named for S’Klallam leader sets sail Aug. 29
Funding awarded for regional cultural projects
Oenga settlement breaks down
USET, NCAI seek reversal of Cape Wind approval
Idaho tribe hopes to save ‘magical’ sturgeon
Judge orders county to return seized Cayuga cigarettes
Northwest educators meet
Cobell settlement succeeds again in House
Confederated Colville Tribes and NRCS welcome spring salmon
Navajo DOJ: Ranch program under investigation
Murder case dropped in 1981 CA tribal slaying
250 still without drinking water on reservation
Viejas ceremonial sanctified burial site to be protected ‘in perpetuity’

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Opinion

Being Frank
The Swinomish Tribe is sharing part of its traditional tribal lands with the public, thanks to an innovative partnership.The tribe and the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission have purchased Kiket Island and will manage it together as part of Deception Pass State Park.
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