Wednesday, July 23, 2008

Today's Democracy Now!


Former Arlington National Cemetery Public Affairs Director Says She Was Fired for Refusing to Limit Press at Funerals
The secretary of the Army has ordered an internal review to examine the Army’s firing last month of the former public affairs director of Arlington National Cemetery. Gina Gray assumed the role of public affairs director of Arlington in April. She quickly discovered that cemetery officials were attempting to impose new limits on media coverage of funerals of the US soldiers killed in Iraq—even after the families of the dead soldiers had agreed to let the press attend. After she pushed for greater media access, she says she was fired in a retaliatory move. [includes rush transcript]

Suicide or Murder? Three Years After the Death of Pfc. LaVena Johnson in Iraq, Her Parents Continue Their Call for a Congressional Investigation
Three years ago, on July 19, 2005, Army Private First Class LaVena Johnson was found dead in Balad, Iraq. Her body was found in a tent belonging to the private military contractor KBR. She had abrasions all over her body, a broken nose, a black eye, burned hands, loose teeth, acid burns on her genitals, and a bullet hole in her head. The Army labeled Johnson’s death a suicide. But her parents never believed that story. They think she was raped and murdered and are now demanding a full congressional investigation into their daughter’s death. [includes rush transcript–partial]

Performance Artist Laurie Anderson on War, Art and Her Latest Work, "Homeland"
We bring you a conversation with performance artist Laurie Anderson. Her highly unusual style has made her a well-known figure in the world of avant-garde and experimental art since the 1970s. Her latest performance is called “Homeland” held at the Lincoln Center in New York City this week. We speak with Laurie Anderson about “Homeland,” her role as an artist and why she says she “lost [her] country” following the invasion of Iraq.

Yesterday:

* Who's Paying for the Conventions? Corporate Sponsors Pour Millions into Party Coffers *

Less than two weeks after Congress granted retroactive immunity to telecoms involved in the Bush spy program, it's been learned AT&T will be emblazoned on every delegate's bag at the Democratic National Convention. Like Comcast, Motorola, Coca-Cola, Google and a host of other corporate sponsors, the telecom giant has donated over a million dollars to the DNC in return for
prominent display space and access to elected officials. But none of these companies have fully disclosed their projected contributions to the convention, according to a new report from the Campaign Finance Institute. We speak with the group's associate director for policy, Steve Weissman.

Listen/Watch/Read:

http://www.democracynow.org/2008/7/22/whos_paying_for_the_conventions


* Obama Adviser Cass Sunstein Debates Glenn Greenwald on FISA Vote, Executive Power and Prosecuting White House Officials for War Crimes *

We host a discussion with Cass Sunstein, an informal adviser to Barack Obama and an outgoing University of Chicago Law School professor who has been described as "the nation's most-cited legal scholar," and Glenn Greenwald, a former constitutional law attorney and political and legal blogger for Salon.com. The two debate issues ranging from the FISA bill to Obama's refusal to support calls for the prosecution of President Bush and top White House officials for war crimes and other abuses of power.

Listen/Watch/Read:

http://www.democracynow.org/2008/7/22/obama_adviser_cass_sunstein_debates


* Nudge: Cass Sunstein on Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth and Happiness *

Cass Sunstein, an outgoing professor at the University of Chicago Law School and Department of Political Science, joins us to talk about his latest book, co-authored with Richard Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness.

Listen/Watch/Read:

http://www.democracynow.org/2008/7/22/nudge_cass_sunstein_on_improving


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